FieldDB: An on/offline cloud data entry app which adapts to its user’s I-Language.

iLanguage Lab is getting ready to launch FieldDB, a cloud based data entry app created for researchers at McGill, Concordia and University of California Santa Cruz. FieldDB is written in 100% Javascript and uses CouchDB, a NoSQL data store which scales to accomodate large amounts of unstructured data. CouchDB uses Map Reduce to efficiently search across data, a win-win for our clients. FieldDB uses fieldlinguistics and machine learning to automatically adapt to its user’s data. Most importantly, even though FieldDB is a WebApp that runs in your browser, FieldDB can run 100% offline. FieldDB will go into beta testing the first week of July. FieldDB will be officially launched in English and Spanish on August 1st 2012 in Patzun, Guatemala.

FieldDB launch in Patzún Guatemala at CAML.

FieldDB launch in Patzún Guatemala at CAML.

What is FieldDB?

FieldDB is a free, open source project developed collectively by field linguists and software developers to make a modular, user-friendly app which can be used to collect, search and share your data.

Who can I use FieldDB with?

  • FieldDB is a Chrome app, which means it works on Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, iPad, and also offline.
  • Multiple collaborators can add to the same corpus, and you can encrypt any piece of data, keep it private within your corpus, or make it public to share with the community and other researchers.

How can FieldDB save me time?

FieldDB uses machine learning and computational linguistics to adapt to your existing organization of the data which you import and predict how to gloss it. FieldDB already supports import and export of many common formats, including ELAN, Praat, Toolbox, FLEx, Filemaker Pro, LaTeX, xml, csv and more, but if you have another format you’d like to import or export, Contact Us.

What are the principles behind FieldDB?

We designed FieldDB from the ground up to be user-friendly, but also to conform to EMELD and DataOne best practices on formatting, archiving, open access, and security. For more information, see Section 6 of our white paper. We vow never to use your private data, you can find out more in our privacy policy.

Curious how it works? FieldDB is OpenSourced on GitHub

Fork me on GitHub

2 thoughts on “FieldDB: An on/offline cloud data entry app which adapts to its user’s I-Language.

  1. The Google.org Endangered Languages Project, a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about endangered languages. Documenting the 3,000+ languages that are on the verge of extinction (about half of all languages in the world) is an important step in preserving cultural diversity, honoring the knowledge of our elders and empowering our youth. Technology can strengthen these efforts by helping people create high-quality recordings of their elders (often the last speakers of a language), connecting diaspora communities through social media and facilitating language learning.

    The Endangered Languages Project, backed by a new coalition, the Alliance for Linguistic Diversity, gives those interested in preserving languages a place to store and access research, share advice and build collaborations. People can share their knowledge and research directly through the site and help keep the content up-to-date. A diverse group of collaborators have already begun to contribute content ranging from 18th-century manuscripts to modern teaching tools like video and audio language samples and knowledge-sharing articles. Members of the Advisory Committee have also provided guidance, helping shape the site and ensure that it addresses the interests and needs of language communities.

    Google has played a role in the development and launch of this project, but the long-term goal is for true experts in the field of language preservation to take the lead. As such, in a few months we’ll officially be handing over the reins to the First Peoples’ Cultural Council (FPCC) and The Institute for Language Information and Technology (The LINGUIST List) at Eastern Michigan University. FPCC will take on the role of Advisory Committee Chair, leading outreach and strategy for the project. The LINGUIST List will become the Technical Lead. Both organizations will work in coordination with the Advisory Committee.

    As part of this project, research about the world’s most threatened languages is being shared by the Catalogue of Endangered Languages (ELCat), led by teams at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa and Eastern Michigan University, with funding provided by the National Science Foundation. Work on ELCat has only just begun, and we’re sharing it through our site so that feedback from language communities and scholars can be incorporated to update our knowledge about the world’s most at-risk languages. Building upon other efforts to preserve and promote culture online, Google.org has seeded this project’s development. We invite interested organizations to join the effort. By bridging independent efforts from around the world we hope to make an important advancement in confronting language endangerment. This project’s future will be decided by those inspired to join this collaborative effort for language preservation. We hope you’ll join us.

    Posted by Clara Rivera Rodriguez and Jason Rissman, Project Managers, The Endangered Languages Project

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